Dropped Objects Videos from Toolbox

We are sharing this three-part Stop Drops series from TOOLBOX

https://toolbox.energyinst.org/about-toolbox  as these are very educational videos tackling the different Drops hazards and risks; and what companies can do to mitigate those risks. Toolbox is free to use. It holds incident lessons and safety information shared by global energy companies for you to use at work every day, helping you and your team to get home safe.

Developed by the Energy Institute (EI), Toolbox quickly connects you and other users around the world to health and safety insights from leading energy companies partnered with the EI, including BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, Phillips 66, Shell and Total.

Stop drops - part 1: Dropped objects when working at height

https://toolbox.energyinst.org/c/videos/stop-drops2

Objects falling from height are an ever-present hazard with potential to kill, but it can be avoided, and we all have a role to play! In this video, we see workers on top of a tank. Various barriers and controls are in place, but a flange that is being removed slips out of the hands of the workers and falls through a gap in the grating, narrowly missing another worker below. 

Stop drops - part 2: Dropped objects from fixed items and structures 

https://toolbox.energyinst.org/c/videos/dropped-objects-from-fixed-items-and-structures 

In this second video, we see a corroded bolt lying on a walkway of an offshore platform. Later, a piece of angle iron falls to the walkway in the same area and strikes a worker. 

Stop drops - part 3: Dropped objects from lifting activities

https://toolbox.energyinst.org/c/videos/dropped-objects-from-lifting-activities

In this third and final video, the story presented is about a dropped object incident on a drill ship during a lifting and hoisting operation. 

Effective learning from incidents (LFI) is critical for safe working. The reasons leading to many of our health, safety and environmental (HS&E) incidents are not new. Incidents are often repeat events or events that are very similar in nature to previous incidents. So the immediate question we ask is, ‘Why have we not learned from these past events and why do people continue to make errors or ignore rules and good practices?’.

Through LFI, organisations gather knowledge about what went wrong in the past (incidents, accidents and near misses) and change working practices to prevent future incidents. But without effective learning processes, or effectively engaging with the workforce, organisations are at risk of repeating the same incidents, or suffering incidents with similar causes.

For more info: https://heartsandminds.energyinst.org/toolkit/reflective-lfi